Danielle Keeton-Olsen
Armed police monitor participants of a tree blessing ceremony in Prey Lang protected forest in 2019 (Licadho)

Officials Block Prey Lang Activists From Forest Ahead of Annual Event

The Environment Ministry and local authorities on Friday prevented hundreds of environmental rights advocates and others from entering the Prey Lang protected area for an annual forest conservation event set for the weekend, a ministry spokesman and rights group said.

Online vendor Ven Rachna, who sells clothing via her Facebook page under the name Thai Srey Neang, is escorted by officers outside the Tuol Kork district police station on February 20, 2020 (Phnom Penh Municipal Police)

Court Questions Online Clothes Seller Over ‘Sexy’ Sales Videos

An online clothes seller was questioned in court and accused by police of committing pornography crimes on Thursday, after posting photos of herself in supposedly revealing attire on the same day that she was “educated” not to do so by authorities.

The gate to Phnom Penh's Correctional Center 2 (CC2) prison (Licadho)

Five-Month-Old Baby Raised in Prey Sar Prison Dies Under State’s Care

A five-month-old child who lived with her incarcerated mother in a Phnom Penh prison died while under the care of state institutions, human rights group Licadho said, following renewed calls by Prime Minister Hun Sen to hasten trial proceedings for women in detention.

Construction of the Don Sahong dam in Laos in 2016 (International Rivers)

Downstream Mekong Nations Raise Concerns Over Proposed Laos Dam

Downstream Mekong countries, including Cambodia, have asked Laos to take a deeper look at the environmental impacts of a planned large-scale hydropower dam that academics and activists say will maim the mainstream Mekong River, which is already showing signs of severe damage.

Salt lays out to dry in a greenhouse at Thaung Trading Company's processing laboratory in Kampot province in September 2019. (Danielle Keeton-Olsen/VOD)

Unpredictable Seasons Put Cambodia’s Salt on Shaky Ground

Salt has been a staple of Cambodia’s coastal economy for a thousand years, but changing weather patterns and rising sea levels — attributed to global warming and the fluctuations in seasons that result — are making the future of the industry less certain.