economy
Delivery workers in Phnom Penh on October 29, 2020. (Hy Chhay/VOD)

Slashed Pay, Intense Competition Follow in Wake of Delivery Boom

Following aggressive expansion by the country’s delivery services, a number of drivers speak of fast-dropping delivery fees, which some say have fallen to a third of what they once got; uncertainty over worker benefits; and a lack of collective representation.

Residents are rescued from floodwaters in Phnom Penh’s Dangkao district on October 17, 2020. (Tran Techseng/VOD)

Floodwaters Disrupt Production at Factories, Affecting 16,000 Workers

About 16,000 factory workers are currently unable to go to work due to flooding in Phnom Penh and the provinces of Kandal and Takeo, the Labor Ministry said on Wednesday, with an economist warning of a hit to the economy and rising prices due to the recent extreme weather.

Rice field rats caught in Koh Andet district are sold to brokers for 4,000 to 5,000 riel ($1 to $1.25) a kilogram. (Ananth Baliga/VOD)

In Takeo, Migrant Families Turn to Rat Trade Amid Covid-19 Pandemic

During the rainy season, rising waters in the rice fields surrounding Takeo’s Koh Andet district provide an ample supply of rodents. As the global economic downturn leaves many jobless, some are turning to catching and exporting rats to make ends meet.

Prime Minister Hun Sen (center) observes fish and frog ponds at the Freshwater Aquaculture Research and Development Center in Prey Veng province in a photo posted to Hun Sen’s Facebook page on July 14, 2020.

Covid-19 to Help Boost Cambodia’s Agricultural Sector, Hun Sen Says

Prime Minister Hun Sen has touted Cambodia’s “strong” agricultural sector as a solution to economic pressures during the global pandemic, though some observers doubt agriculture could make up for garment sector losses due to Covid-19 and the pending withdrawal of some E.U. trade perks.

People visit Angkor Wat in Siem Reap province. (VOD)

World Bank Projects Negative Growth in Cambodia, a First Since 1994

Cambodia could see negative growth this year — for the first time since 1994 — due to the pandemic-spurred economic crisis, the World Bank projected on Friday, estimating even more severe hits to the nation’s key industries than it did two months ago.